My buddy Gary Leff over at View from the Wing just wrote an enticing post titled “Woman Kicked Off American Airlines Flight For The Mask She Was Wearing And I’m So Confused.” Of course I clicked on the link, probably just like you clicked on this post to see what the mask looks like.

I was really expecting something borderline controversial or political but after seeing “F___ fentanyl” written in full all over her mask, I’m really not sure why Gary or anyone else could be confused about why she got the boot.

First of all, I deeply sympathize with her that her son died of fentanyl. A parent’s loss of a child, no matter their age, is an unfathomable tragedy and I seriously pray every night for all my friends who unimaginably have lost theirs.

I’m pretty sure that we all agree with the sentiment F___ fentanyl and F___ cancer and every other disease that robs us of our loved ones. But do we really need to wear the words F*CK spelled out in full across our clothing? Especially when going out in public traveling with little kids around?

I would be offended no matter what accompanied the  F___. Heck, she could have been wearing a  F___ Terrorists or F___ Murderers or F___ The Baby Shark Song no one can get of their head and I would still maintain that it’s unacceptable.

If she’d worn the F___ fentanyl mask to a substance-related grief support meeting, I would high-five her, give her two thumbs up and a hug. The bigger picture scenario matters. But wearing it on an airplane?

Also, travelers have to remember that whenever you buy an airplane ticket, you agree to the airline’s contract of carriage. American states in their contract of carriage that passengers must “dress appropriately; bare feet or offensive clothing aren’t allowed.”

But I do see why Gary wrote his clever and enticing headline about why he was confused. It’s because earlier this year, a passenger wore a F___ Cancer sweatshirt and after a gate agent denied the woman boarding, the airline later apologized, stating that the agent: “should have taken the broader context of the message displayed on the customer’s shirt into consideration when explaining our policies.”

That is ridiculous. There shouldn’t be a double standard and every airline should hold a firm stance. Is the F word allowed on clothing or not when boarding a plane? Personally, I don’t get what people don’t get. Where has decency and common sense in this country gone?

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3 Comments On "American Airlines Kicks Off A Passenger Because of the Written Words on Her Face Mask and I Don't Get What Other People Don't Get"
  1. Bret|

    I have several “F— Cancer” shirts and would never wear them on a plane. One of the upsides to higher air fares is that I see fewer people wearing flip flops, tank tops, pajamas and other slobby clothing. Free speech has limits just as all of our positive rights do – you can’t yell “Fire!” in a crowded theater, nor can you own a howitzer. Calm down, shut it and everyone can have a better (less miserable) travel experience.

  2. Kelly s|

    I have been battling cancer for 6 years…and I still will never were a F cancer shirt. I am also a parent and when I am with my kids I do take offense to clothing like that. And yes I think anyone who wears obscenities in public should expect a business to be able to ask them to leave. I get so sick of people saying ‘it’s a free country’ thinking when they are in public they can do or say anything or wear anything and it doesn’t matter.

  3. Robert|

    “I may not agree with what you say but I will defend your right to say it till death”-Voltaire. The problem with rules are the rules themselves. The arbitrary application of “offensive” leaves the interpretation to each unique individual. I don’t find the mask offensive either since it isn’t insulting any particular individual. I wouldn’t wear a mask like this anywhere; but I am blessed to not have lost a child. I’ve seen certain trucks dangle a pair from their hitch. The reality is kids can’t be shielded from the real world and in many ways it’s good for them to see behavior that doesn’t align with the family values. Because, as parents, we should define our own values and spell out bad behavior at home. This way kids know that not everyone shares our same beliefs or values. I recall a lady not allowed to board for wearing spandex or a guy with stinky clothes made to change them. Airlines should spell out what is offensive so that airline crews can enforce it. Otherwise why not make us all wear Squid Games jumper suits. If Airlines aren’t willing to list out what they don’t want, then we still have free speech in America (even when we don’t agree with the message).

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