Car insurance rates are rising in most parts of the country, including states like Oklahoma. With legislation that will require more stringent insurance regulations for peer-to-peer car rentals, this trend will likely continue. In any case, rates vary widely based on the insurer, city/county, age, driving history, type of vehicle, and even credit score.

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Car Insurance Laws for Oklahoma

To get a clearer idea of how auto insurance works and how to find the best car insurance companies in Oklahoma, let’s first examine how Oklahoma state law regulates drivers, their insurance, and their vehicles.

According to the Oklahoma Motor Vehicle Division, drivers must abide by the following regulations:

  • All registered vehicles are required to maintain minimum liability insurance.
  • At a minimum, drivers must obtain the following:
    • Bodily Injury Liability of $25,000 per person
    • Bodily Injury Liability of $50,000 per accident
    • Property Damage Liability of $25,000 per accident
    • Uninsured Motorist Coverage of $25,000 per person
    • Uninsured Motorist Coverage of $50,000 per accident
  • Oklahoma drivers must keep proof of insurance in their vehicles at all times.

How Car Insurance Rates are Determined in Oklahoma

As of the latest data, good drivers in Oklahoma pay an average of $1,345 annually for auto insurance or about $112 per month. Rates vary by the insurance provider, location, insurance type, and level of coverage. However, these rates are also highly dependent on drivers. When an insurance provider is calculating your rates, they will look at the following factors:

  • Location – Generally, if you live, commute, or work in an urban area (like Oklahoma City, Tulsa, or Norman), your rates will be higher, as accidents are more prevalent in densely-populated regions. However, other location-based factors are important, too, like adverse weather conditions and reports of vandalism.
  • Age – Statistically, younger drivers get in more accidents. This means that the younger you are, the more you will need to pay in insurance premiums. The average age in Oklahoma is 36, which is lower than the national average.
  • Gender – Men are more likely than women to get in accidents, so your gender could impact your auto rates as well.
  • Marital Status – Typically, married couples take fewer risks than their single counterparts, which holds for driving. Married couples get in fewer accidents, and therefore pose a smaller risk for insurance providers.
  • Driving Experience – While this metric is similar to age, it is still slightly different. Usually, the older you are, the longer you have been driving, but that is not always true. Nonetheless, people who have held a driver’s license for longer are more experienced and pay lower premiums.
  • Driving Record – A driver’s record is one of the most important factors that insurance providers consider. If you have a history of frequent speeding tickets, DUIs, or other infractions, you will have to pay more.
  • Claims Record – It is also important to consider how many claims you have made to insurance providers in the past (if any). At-fault claims will cause your premiums to rise, while not-at-fault collisions will generally have no impact on your rates.
  • Credit History – Your credit is a good indicator of how financially responsible you are. Still, the research also shows that people with low credit tend to file more claims, making them a greater risk for insurance providers.
  • Previous Insurance Coverage – If you have maintained auto insurance without any gaps, your new insurance provider will see this as a good sign. However, if you went for several years, months, or even days without any insurance, you will be seen as high-risk.
  • Vehicle Type – Certain cars are driven differently, which means that certain cars are more prone to accidents. Some cars are also more prone to theft or vandalism.
  • Use of Vehicle – When you exclusively use your vehicle for personal use, you are less likely to get in an accident. However, if you take long business trips or frequently drive for your work, you increase your collision chances.
  • Annual Mileage – How much you drive directly impacts your chances of getting in an accident. No matter how you use your vehicle (personal or business use), if you put a lot of mileage on your car, you are more likely to file a claim with your insurance provider.
  • Number of Policies – Finally, the type of insurance you want/need will help determine your rates. The more policies you have (liability, comprehensive, uninsured motorist, etc.), the more you will need to pay.

Best Car Insurance Companies for Oklahoma

When looking at rates across the entire state, 4 major insurance companies consistently provide low rates for good drivers. Additionally, several other companies provide low rates in certain cities and counties but do not consistently provide low rates statewide. In any case, let’s take a look at some of the lowest auto insurance rates and best car insurance companies available in the state of Oklahoma:

ProviderAnnual RateMonthly Rate
State Farm$524$44
Geico$568$47
Oklahoma Farm Bureau$610$50
Progressive$617$51

It is important to note that the table above shows the average rates for the minimum coverage required by Oklahoma’s state. For comprehensive or “full coverage,” the rates are significantly higher:

ProviderAnnual RateMonthly Rate
State Farm$1315$110
Geico$1368$114
Oklahoma Farm Bureau$1404$117
Progressive$1471$123

These are approximate rates based on statewide polling for 40-year-old men and women with good driving records. Naturally, individual rates will vary. So, to get a better picture of auto insurance rates around the state, let’s look at how rates vary by city.

Car Insurance Rates by City

Besides your driving history, your location is one of the most important factors when calculating auto insurance costs. Population, crime rates, weather conditions, and the cost of living can affect the amount you pay each year. Individuals who live and work in rural areas typically have the lowest rates; however, most Oklahoma residents live in urban or suburban areas, where rates tend to increase.

The table below shows the average yearly auto insurance rates for 40 of the most populated cities in Oklahoma, in alphabetical order. These are approximate rates based on statewide polling for 40-year-old men and women with good driving records. Additionally, this data is taken from all of the best car insurance companies in Oklahoma. Here is what the data shows:

CityAverage Yearly Rate
Ada$1385
Ardmore$1452
Bartlesville$1296
Bethany$1460
Blanchard$1344
Broken Arrow$1487
Chickasha$1411
Choctaw$1263
Claremore$1255
Coweta$1332
Cushing$1366
Del City$1212
Durant$1267
Edmond$1390
El Reno$1248
Elk City$1316
Enid$1380
Guthrie$1315
Guymon$1326
Jenks$1288
Lawton$1482
McAlester$1376
Midwest City$1334
Moore$1295
Muskogee$1320
Mustang$1298
Newcastle$1354
Norman$1311
Oklahoma City$1454
Okmulgee$1310
Owasso$1287
Pryor$1339
Sand Springs$1307
Sapulpa$1266
Shawnee$1402
Stillwater$1347
Tulsa$1456
Tuttle$1358
Wagoner$1322
Woodward$1296

Now, let’s take a closer look at the top-5 largest cities in Oklahoma and compare their respective auto insurance rates:

Oklahoma City

The average annual premium in Oklahoma City is $710 for minimum liability insurance and $1454 for full auto coverage. The state capital of Oklahoma is also its most populated city, with close to 600,000 residents. However, it is also one of the largest cities in the United States in terms of land area. As a result, traffic is not a major issue. However, Oklahoma City usually gets hail storms at least once a year, which can cause significant damage to vehicles and contribute to higher insurance premiums.

Tulsa

The average annual premium in Tulsa is $716 for minimum liability insurance and $1456 for full auto coverage. This city is well-known for its booming oil industry and popular college sports programs. However, it is also one of the most dangerous cities in Oklahoma for drivers. Tulsa is much more densely populated than Oklahoma City, so traffic-related accidents are a daily issue.

Norman

In Norman, the average annual premium is $642 for minimum liability insurance and $1311 for full auto coverage. Even though Norman has a population that is about a third the size of Tulsa’s population, it is a popular destination for students and tourists. This is because Norman is home to the University of Oklahoma, the largest university in the state. While the weather is usually not an issue, traffic jams are common, especially during large sporting events.

Broken Arrow

In Broken Arrow, the average annual premium is $744 for minimum liability insurance and $1487 for full auto coverage. Historically, the local economy in Broken Arrow was driven by agriculture, though it has diversified to other industries in recent years. With this diversification came increased migration, driving up the cost of living. As a result, Broken Arrow has some of the highest insurance premiums in all of Oklahoma.

Lawton

In Lawton, the average annual premium is $711 for minimum liability insurance and $1482 for full auto coverage. Lawton has a population of nearly 100,000, which has steadily grown over the past two decades. Additionally, the city brings in tourists every year, thanks largely to its cultural centers dedicated to local Native American history. Traffic accidents and vandalism are high in Lawton, both of which keep premiums from dropping.

Conclusion

As you can see, many variables affect the cost of auto insurance in the state of Oklahoma. Additionally, the figures provided above are averages based on adults with good driving records, so the exact rates you pay may differ. Nonetheless, we hope that this information helps you when you’re ready to obtain a new policy or upgrade your current one with one of the best car insurance companies in Oklahoma.

If you’d like to learn more about acquiring auto insurance in your state, consult some of our other auto insurance guides. If you’re looking for more information about Oklahoma auto insurance, consult the Oklahoma Motor Vehicle Division for the most up to date information.

Matthew Jones