Two weeks ago, we wrote about Wordle and last week, we wrote about Airportle, both word games that are lots of fun and pretty addictive. By now, you’ve probably read the news that the New York Times has purchased Wordle for an undisclosed amount in the low seven figures. It was surprising news but not at all unexpected. In fact, my mother and I had had a lengthy conversation just last week about monetizing Wordle and the fact that there were no ads on the game. My take was that the money for creator Josh Wardle (a software engineer who created the game for his partner to pass time during the pandemic) wouldn’t come in the form of ad revenue but in being acquired by someone like The New York Times. And lo and behold! The word game that’s taken the Internet by storm is surely now en route to getting bundled with the New York Times’ other games (my favorites are Spelling Bee, The Crossword and The Mini) and many fervent fans (myself included) are left wondering how this will impact game play? Will we now have to pay for a subscription? I certainly hope not. Talk about killing the charm of this easily accessed game. However, according to Wardle, in a statement released yesterday on Twitter, “When the game moves to the NYT site, it will be free to play for everyone, and I am working with them to make sure your wins and streaks will be preserved.”

While Wordle seems to be universally loved, one of the biggest complaints users have is that you can only play once a day, although I do think that that’s precisely what’s made it so popular. In this case, less is more truly is more. But for those of you who can’t get enough Wordle and just want to play again and again, I’ve got some good news for you.

If you ever miss a day or wish that you could go back and play previous Wordle games, well, you can! Here is an archive of past Wordles. And Word Master is essentially the same game as Wordle. It’s got the same rules and you can play over and over again.

If you haven’t played Wordle yet, I highly recommend you check it out and if you’re already a fan, then enjoy some extended play. It’s the perfect way to pass time at the airport or on the plane after you’ve settled into your seat and are waiting for takeoff. Happy Wordle-ing!

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1 Comment On "Can’t Get Enough Wordle? Here’s How to Play More Than Once a Day"
  1. Annie|

    Hello wordl is another of the same game that you can play over and over

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