World’s Highest Skating Rink Open For the Season

HancockView

A view from the John Hancock Observatory

For the third year, Chicago’s John Hancock Observatory reopened the much anticipated world’s highest skating rink on January 1st, more than 1,000 feet above The Magnificent Mile!  The rink features tempered glass wall boards, offering skaters an amazing view of Lake Michigan, Lake Shore Drive and the Chicago skyline from the 94th floor.

The ‘ice’ rink, which measures approximately 20’ x 45’ feet, is a synthetic surface called Xtraice and is the closest thing to real ice without water.  Even though skaters take to the ‘ice’ in the middle of winter, the experience is all inside, so there’s no getting cold – or wet – a major benefit for parents of small children and for those hoping to stay away from the low wind chill of the outdoors.

Visitors can glide amidst the clouds for all types of occasions, including family outings and romantic dates.  For those visiting Chicago, John Hancock Observatory and Skating in the Sky is a must – it is truly a unique way to really see the city, with the best views around.

A 25-minute skating session is $6 (plus admission to John Hancock Observatory*) and guests are welcome to either bring their own skates or rent them for only $1.  The rink is open daily from 9am to 10:30 pm and closes in April.

HancockIceRink

*General admission to the Observatory is $17.50 for adults, $11.50 for youth, free for children under 3. 

Ben Stagg

The comments on this page are not provided, reviewed, or otherwise approved by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided by any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Rate this post

Be the first to comment on "World’s Highest Skating Rink Open For the Season"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.